Architectural Antagonism by an Acute Arbovirus

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“For many years, if not from the time of the introduction of the Merino sheep into the Colony, there has been prevalent amongst the flocks a disease known as fever. This disease is most prevalent during the summer months, and is very much worse in wet seasons.” That was a quote from the Report of… Continue reading

ICP0 and Skyewalker…no, this isn’t an episode of Star Wars!

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In this blog post, Professor Roger Everett, who retired recently from the CVR after decades spent in Glasgow (157 papers published… and counting!), answers some of our pressing questions in a Q and A with Siobhan Petrie, our communications officer. If you like what you read have a listen to the podcast interview with Roger… Continue reading

Steve Goodbourn ….and a world full of chickens and their viruses

 Professor Steve Goodbourn, from St George’s, University of London, talks with PhD students Joanna Morrell and Yasmin Parr about his his work on unravelling the biochemical mysteries of how viruses unravel the innate immune system of their hosts. Steve’s work has been integral to our understanding of how some of the most dangerous viruses can infect… Continue reading

Innate Immunity: Slippery when wet

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Dr Jens Madsen, Associate Professor in Child Health at the University of Southampton, talks with PhD students Yasmin Parr and Joanna Morrell for episode 8 of Contagious Thinking and tells us all about the mucosal surfactant proteins, the Collectins, that form a crucial innate immune barrier against viruses and other microbes. Jens and his lab… Continue reading

Hair today, gone tomorrow: influenza and its filaments

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Dr David Bhella (CVR programme leader) and Dr Ed Hutchinson (MRC research fellow at the CVR) tell us about influenza and its filamentous nature. Even after eighty years of studying them, we still tend to forget what influenza viruses look like.  In a paper published this week, the Hutchinson and Bhella labs (together with collaborators… Continue reading

What do you mean by ‘infectivity’? A conversation with Richard Hardy

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  Is the ebolavirus mutating to become more transmissible in humans? Why was Zika virus able to move across the world so rapidly? Why are some viruses able to spread via aerosols floating in the air? While these may all appear to be very distinct questions, there is one major factor that connects them: the concept… Continue reading

Viruses in the apiary: an interview with Dave Evans

In our 6th episode, Dr Andrew Shaw, CVR postdoc (and @virusmuser), chats with Professor Dave Evans, (@evanslabuk) a virologist from the University of St Andrews, about bees and their viruses. Dave visited the CVR last year where he talked about his lab’s work on studying the replication and recombination of positive sense RNA viruses, like… Continue reading

The CVR at Glasgow Science Festival 2016: exploring biological structure and innovation through viruses

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In a world obsessed with the deadly nature of viruses, join us in a celebration of the beauty of their biological structure. Glasgow is a fascinating place to live, with awesome architecture and design emerging from the dramatic Scottish landscape. Although invisibly small, viruses also produce strikingly beautiful structures, constructed from the local materials of… Continue reading

Can proteomics help us cure virus latency?

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In this episode we talk with Dr Mike Weekes, a clinical consultant and Wellcome Trust Senior Clinical Fellow at the University of Cambridge. Mike visited the CVR a few weeks ago and gave a wonderful seminar about his lab’s work on using a technique he pioneered called ‘quantitative temporal viromics’ (which is a kind of… Continue reading

Battling ebolavirus in Sierra Leone

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Before we had Zika virus on our minds there was Ebola. 2015 saw the most devastating human epidemic of ebolavirus ever recorded.  This outbreak began in December 2013 in the forests of Guinea and spread rapidly into neighbouring countries of Liberia and Sierra Leone, reaching Nigeria, the USA and even Glasgow, Scotland in the UK.… Continue reading