Viruses in the apiary: an interview with Dave Evans

In our 6th episode, Dr Andrew Shaw, CVR postdoc (and @virusmuser), chats with Professor Dave Evans, (@evanslabuk) a virologist from the University of St Andrews, about bees and their viruses. Dave visited the CVR last year where he talked about his lab’s work on studying the replication and recombination of positive sense RNA viruses, like… Continue reading

The CVR at Glasgow Science Festival 2016: exploring biological structure and innovation through viruses

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In a world obsessed with the deadly nature of viruses, join us in a celebration of the beauty of their biological structure. Glasgow is a fascinating place to live, with awesome architecture and design emerging from the dramatic Scottish landscape. Although invisibly small, viruses also produce strikingly beautiful structures, constructed from the local materials of… Continue reading

Can proteomics help us cure virus latency?

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In this episode we talk with Dr Mike Weekes, a clinical consultant and Wellcome Trust Senior Clinical Fellow at the University of Cambridge. Mike visited the CVR a few weeks ago and gave a wonderful seminar about his lab’s work on using a technique he pioneered called ‘quantitative temporal viromics’ (which is a kind of… Continue reading

Battling ebolavirus in Sierra Leone

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Before we had Zika virus on our minds there was Ebola. 2015 saw the most devastating human epidemic of ebolavirus ever recorded.  This outbreak began in December 2013 in the forests of Guinea and spread rapidly into neighbouring countries of Liberia and Sierra Leone, reaching Nigeria, the USA and even Glasgow, Scotland in the UK.… Continue reading

How does HIV move its deadly infection from cell-to-cell? Episode 3.

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Here, on World AIDS day, we meet Dr Clare Jolly, HIV virologist, about her work and her groups work on how HIV spreads from cell-to-cell and what this means for antiviral treatment and vaccination.   Clare is a Senior Research Fellow in the Division of Infection & Immunity at University College London and was at… Continue reading

Podcast ep 2: Mary Collins – meet the expert

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  Here we talk with Professor Mary Collins, immunologist and virologist, about her work on developing viral vector-based gene therapies. Mary is Professor of Immunology in the Division of Infection and Immunity at University College London, the head of the Division of Advanced Therapies at the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, and the… Continue reading

Espionage, martinis and explosions: How reprogramming viruses can help us fight cancer.

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Alex Binks, Ph.D. student. Copyright, Alex Binks.

By Alex Binks. Alex is an MRC-funded Ph.D. student at the University of Glasgow, working with Professor Iain McNeish at the Institute for Cancer Sciences and the Beatson Institute. Alex’s essay, about his research on oncolytic herpesviruses, was runner-up in the MRC Max Perutz Science Writing Competition 2015 and is published below in full with permission from Alex and the MRC.… Continue reading

Human cells can ADAP2 inhibit virus entry

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Cells expressing green actin and red ADAP2. Membrane ruffling shown with white arrows (Shu et al., 2015)

Knowledge of how cells and organisms defend themselves against pathogenic microbes is of paramount interest in our understanding of infection and immunity. Determining the mechanism by which cells achieve this – and exploiting this knowledge – may aid in the development of therapies as well as improving our understanding of how these microbes cause disease. Shu et al., (from the… Continue reading

Arbovirus vectors: a view to a kill

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Ixodid ticks are the vectors for CCHFV and SFTSV. Credit: Center for Disease Control Public Health Image Library.

As the International Meeting on Arboviruses and their Vectors, kicks off today in Glasgow with the Society for General Microbiology (#IMAV15),  we’d like to present to you the fifth and final in a series of posts about arboviruses, their vertebrate hosts and their arthropod vectors. This post, written by Dr Alain Kohl ,CVR Arthropod-borne infections programme leader along with… Continue reading